Acknowledgements

Marine Geospatial Ecology Tools is built atop a lot of other software, much of it free. In addition to acknowledging the support of our sponsors, we would particularly like to thank the following developers, listed in alphabetical order, for making their excellent work freely reusable. Without your work, MGET would never have gotten off the ground. Cheers to all of you!

  • Stefan Behnel, Martijn Faassen, and their collaborators for the lxml Python package. lxml is a Pythonic binding for the libxml2 and libxslt libraries; MGET uses it to invoke those libraries from Python.
  • Howard Butler for the GDAL Python bindings (the osgeo Python package). MGET uses these to invoke GDAL from Python code.
  • Roberto De Almeida and his collaborators for the pydap Python package. MGET uses pydap to download oceanographic data using the OPeNDAP protocol.
  • Lokkju Brennr for the pyspatialite and Gerhard Häring for the pysqlite Python packages. MGET uses these to access the SpatiaLite and SQLite libraries from Python.
  • Phillip Eby, Bob Ippolito, and their collaborators for the setuptools Python package. Currently MGET just includes a copy of pkg_resources from setuptools because it is required by pydap, but we may use setuptools to package a future release of MGET.
  • John D’Errico for the inpaint_nans code. MGET uses inpaint_nans to interpolate missing raster values.
  • Gerald Evenden and Frank Warmerdam for the PROJ4 cartographic projections library. MGET uses PROJ4 to perform projections and great circle distance calculations.
  • Alessandro Furieri for the SpatiaLite. Parts of MGET use SpatiaLite as an internal relational database format and for spatial processing of vector data.
  • Jean-loup Gailly and Mark Adler for the gzip and zlib data compression utilities and libraries.
  • David Goodger and his collaborators for the docutils Python package. MGET uses docutils to build documentation from reStructuredText embedded in Python code.
  • André Gosselin and his collaborators for the pyhdf Python package. MGET uses pyhdf to read HDF version 4 files.
  • Joe Gregorio for the httplib2 Python package. pydap relies on httplib2.
  • Mark Hammond for the pywin32 Python package. MGET uses pywin32 to expose its classes as COM classes, to invoke other COM classes, to perform various installation tasks, and many other things.
  • The developers of the HDF data format and software libraries. MGET uses these to read geospatial data.
  • Stephanie Henson for providing MATLAB code illustrating how to identify eddies using the Okubo-Weiss parameter. We implemented our own version of this for MGET’s eddy detection tools.
  • D. Richard Hipp, Dan Kennedy, Joe Mistachkin, and their collaborators for the SQLite library. Parts of MGET use SQLite as an internal relational database engine.
  • Peter Hollemans and his collaborators for the CoastWatch Utilities. All of the MGET tools that work with NOAA CoastWatch data invoke the CoastWatch Utilities.
  • Timothy H. Keitt, Roger Bivand, Edzer Pebesma, and Barry Rowlingson for the rgdal R package. MGET uses rgdal to invoke GDAL from R code.
  • David G. Long for providing code to read SIR files. MGET uses this code to process scatterometer data published by the BYU MERS Lab.
  • Paul McGuire and his collaborators for the pyparsing Python package. MGET uses pyparsing to parse and expressions in SQL where clause format to DiGIR <filter> XML.
  • Walter Moreira and Gregory Warnes for the rpy Python package. MGET uses rpy to invoke R from Python.
  • Luke Maurits and his collaborators for the prettytable Python package. MGET uses prettytable to format plain text tabular output from Python.
  • Jari Oksanen, Roeland Kindt, Pierre Legendre, Bob O’Hara, Gavin L. Simpson, Peter Solymos, M. Henry H. Stevens, and Helene Wagner for the vegan R package. MGET uses this package to compute biodiversity statistics.
  • Travis Oliphant and his collaborators for the numpy Python package. MGET uses numpy extensively for manipulating data.
  • The developers of the netCDF data format and software libraries. MGET uses these to read geospatial data.
  • Tobias Sing, Oliver Sander, Niko Beerenwinkel, and Thomas Lengauer for the ROCR R package. MGET uses ROCR to plot the ROC and other performance measures for binary classification models.
  • David Ullman, Jean-Francois Cayula, and Peter Cornillon for providing FORTRAN code illustrating the implementation of the Cayula and Cornillon (1992) single-image edge detection algorithm. We implemented our own version of this algorithm in C++ for use in MGET’s SST front detection tools.
  • Guido van Rossum and his many collaborators for the Python programming language. Most of MGET is written in Python.
  • Daniel Veillard and his collaborators for the libxml and libxslt libraries. MGET uses these for various XML processing, including production of HTML documentation from XML produced by docutils, and parsing biogeographic data represented in XML.
  • Jeff Whitaker for the netcdf4-python package and the pyproj Python package. MGET uses these packages to read netCDF files and invoke PROJ4 from Python.

(We still need to add the developers of: matplotlib, moon.py, the Lomb-Scargle code, the R caret package. Apologies for these omissions!)